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G shock 5000

G shock 5000

G shock 5000

In 1983, Casio engineer Kikuo Ibe designed the first G-Shock: the DW-5000C. [1] It had a 10-year battery life, water resistance to 10 bar and was able to survive a 10 meter fall onto a hard surface (he tested 200 prototypes by dropping them from rooftops or third story windows). [2] [3] [4] . [5] The shock resistant design has 10 layers protecting the quartz timekeeping module [2] , including a urethane rubber bumper, the stainless steel case, the hardened mineral glass watch crystal, the stainless steel screwed down caseback, and the "floating module" where the quartz mechanism floats free in a urethane foam cradle, with the outer buttons and LCD module attached with flexible cables. Casio released the G-Shock in April 1983, to fill the demand for durable watches. The popularity of G-Shocks increased throughout the 1990s. By 1998 Casio released over 200 G-Shock models. By then Casio had sold 19 million G-Shocks worldwide. [6] In 1991, Casio released the Baby-G series for women. G-Shock Mini are 70% the size of a G-Shock, for people who have smaller wrists. They are available in Japan and can be shipped worldwide. On September 1 2017, Casio celebrated its 100 millionth shipment of G-Shocks worldwide. [6] The line of watches now includes atomic clock synchronization and solar battery . The Cockpit Series G-Shock is the official timekeeper of Nismo Racing. Many newer G-Shocks feature metal (steel or titanium) banding and analog timekeeping. DW are standard G-Shocks while GW G-Shocks comes in either Tough Solar or Atomic or both. Twice a year the basic models are updated. New limited models are introduced more frequently through the year. As with Swatch watches, G-Shocks have become collectors items. Casio also produces collaboration models, often with popular fashion brands, like A Bathing Ape (Bape), Stussy , [7] Xlarge, KIKS TYO , Nano Universe, Levi`s , Lifted Research Group, as well as Coca Cola , Pulp68 Skateshop, Lucky Strike and Marlboro . G-Shock watches are popular with mountaineers , firefighters , paramedics , people working in the offshore, police officers , astronauts , film directors ( Tony Scott was often pictured wearing a GW-3000B, as is Ron Howard and Francis Ford Coppola ) and soldiers . Ex- Special Forces-British SAS soldier Andy McNab mentions in several of his novels how his character Nick Stone relies on a G-Shock watch. According to Mark Bowden `s book Blackhawk Down , the DELTA Operators wore G-Shock watches during the combat events of 3 & 4 October 1993. Since then, G-Shock watches have become very popular with Special Forces groups in both American and other NATO nation units, due to their being "battle tested".[ citation needed ] Models DW-5600C, DW-5600E, DW-5900, DW-6600, DW-6900 are flight-qualified for NASA space travel. [8] Casio has updated the DW-5600E module, replacing the usual 1545 module with module number 3229 (in 2010). [9] In 2012, Casio released GB-6900, a Bluetooth -capable model of G-Shock. Casio claimed the battery life of 2 years on a single CR2032 battery. [10] Casio continues to add new features to G-Shock watches. Some include Tough Solar battery charging and Multiband 6 time synchronization through radio signals from six transmission stations worldwide. The GW-9400 Rangeman and GWN-1000 Gulfmaster models have a Triple Sensor with a digital compass, thermometer, and barometer/altimeter. The MTG-S1000, GW-A1000, and GPW-1000 feature Triple G Resist which includes resistance to shock, centrifugal gravity , and vibration. In 2014 Casio introduced the GPS Hybrid Wave Ceptor feature in the GPW-1000 Gravitymaster that allows the watch to synchronize the time through GPS signals and also adjusts the time zone automatically. The MRG-G1000 is also equipped with this feature.[ citation needed ] For square G-Shock watches this is highest end premium watch. This model is only available for the Japan domestic Market. The features for this watch include a screw down watch back, DLC (diamond-like carbon) coating, softer and higher quality urethane strap, steel module case, slightly heavier build quality, slightly thicker watch case, solar charging, multi-band 6 and back-light. [11] This model is similar to the GW-5000 but at a fraction of the price. [12] It represents excellent value for the money when compared to the 5000, however the 5610 is still an excellent watch even by itself and many users will definitely be more than happy with this G-Shock without paying more than twice the price for the 5000. To clear up any confusion, even though this watch has a higher model number (5610), the 5000 is considered a superior watch in many ways. Visually there is a red outline on the 5610 watch face compared to the more low-key 5000. G-Shock watches with Multi-Band 6 can tune into an atomic clock for automatic time keeping. There are currently six radio towers around the world: Watches can tune in to two locations: The 40kHz signal from JJY at Mount Otakadoya, near Fukushima (Ohtakadoyayama). Watches tune to the 68kHz signal from BPC at Shangqiu . This is the newest additional signal; older multi-band 5 watches will not be able to connect to this signal. You will need to upgrade to a newer multi-band 6 watch for it to work. On December 12 2017, G-Shock has earned the Guinness World Record for the heaviest vehicle to drive over a watch. Guinness World Record drove a 24.97 ton truck over the Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1. The G-Shock is the first watch by any company being able to withstand the challenge. [13]

eBay определяет цену с помощью модели обучения машины на основе цены продажи товара за последние 90 дней. eBay определяет трендовую цену с помощью модели обучения машины на основе цены продажи товара за последние 90 дней. Новые товары — это абсолютно новые, неиспользованные, нераспакованные и неповрежденные товары. Товары б/у — это товары, бывшие в употреблении. Отправка в течение 1 раб. дня с опцией отслеживания

In front of my tired eyes the words "instant get" started flashing like the dazzling billboards on the streets of Tokyo when I saw this news: the awesome-looking G-Shock 5000-Series, the daddy of all G-Shocks, is getting a full-metal case in steel with the  Casio G-Shock GMW-B 5000 D-1 and in IP gold with the GMW-B 5000 TFG-9. They both also sport all the tech I`ve been missing from, say, this otherwise cool Mudmaster. Let`s take a quick glance at the details of these two new 5000-Series bad boys, accompanied by Casio`s traditionally, famously and consistently crappy, horrendously low-resolution official images – none of which, no matter how awfully bad, can turn me off of one of these. Steel, or any metal for that matter, is the least G-Shocky material I can think of and that is one of the two reasons that makes these two watches get on my "want" list. The first G-Shock, technically, was what you see right above: a plastic ball with a display in it. It was this ball that, many drops from Casio HQ`s 3rd floor bathroom window and some 200 prototypes later, had finally taken the shape of the first G-Shock introduced to the masses – the DW-5000C. Since then, though there have been some rather intense metal G-Shocks (like the MTG-S1000 for $1,000 shown  here , or the MRG-2000 Hammer Tone discussed  here ), G-Shocks have remained associated with their plasticky, rubbery exteriors. The 5000-Series getting a metal case and bracelet has some heft to it (pun intended), because it shows how far G-Shock has come in terms of technology, design, and the sophistication of its audience – i.e. us idiots, who have not only fallen in love with a plastic watch, but who are also somehow strangely attracted to the idea of buying it for many times its base price to get it in what otherwise is the most ubiquitous material in watchmaking. Oh, the self-contradictions and ironies attached to love – and anything watchmaking. The 5000-Series case will measure 49.3 by 43.2 by 13.0 millimeters and will weigh around 167 grams – with the bracelet attached, of course. All stainless steel was used for the exterior, i.e. the bezel, case, caseback, and bracelet, while a new impact-resistant structure has been adopted in the design of the steel case to absorb shock. This features a durable resin material that fits between the polished and brushed bezel cover and the metal core that houses the movement. The bracelet is also secured to this inner black metal core with a massive, screw-headed pin to ensure the durable, but comfortable movement of the bracelet. Even the pushers appear to be metal. Water resistance, but of course, remains 200m, no drop in that, unlike the BS water resistance we have to endure in so many of the recent Swiss luxury watch releases. The typical G-Shock tech featuring a world time, 1/100th second chronograph, perpetual calendar, daily alarms, and so on is spiced up with Tough Solar charging – autonomy is about 22 months after fully charged – Multi Band 6 automatic reference time synchronization for atomic accuracy timekeeping (synced up to 6 times per day, 5 times per day in China), as well as Bluetooth 4.1 low energy connectivity with a communication distance of about 2 meters. The Bluetooth connectivity allows for the use of the "G-Shock Connected" app available on Apple and Android devices. This makes for a 2-way communication: you can set your watch via the app for 300 different cities when traveling, as well as for alarms or sync it for accuracy. With the watch you can find your phone (not sure how you could lose it within 2 meters reach, but if you do, you`re in luck, I guess) as well as create logs – the phone will mark the time and location and you can edit these later. The new Casio G-Shock GMW-B 5000 D-1 in stainless steel will retail for around $600 and the new Casio G-Shock GMW-B 5000 TFG-9 with the IP coated gold exterior will retail for around $700. Both watches will be released on April 13th, and while there`s no official wording on these being limited edition or Japan-only, given our experience with G-Shock releases, I`d be surprised to see these on international markets as early as that date. Nevertheless, I can`t wait to see in person what the 5000-Series looks and feels like in the metal and out in the wild. gshock.com David Bredan (abtw_david) is a young watch enthusiast based in Budapest, Hungary. He is dedicated to understanding, revealing and discussing as many aspects of fine watch making as possible. Fascinated by the countless admirable details of haute horlogerie, he strives to discover the challenges linked to the manufacturing of fine timepieces and also those related to chronometrical performance. As much as he loves unfolding the mysteries of mechanical timepieces, he also aspires to successfully capture and share the nuances that separate a fine watch and a masterpiece.

I really loved this watch, but ultimately decided to return and just continue using my basic $50 DW-5600-E that I picked up at a big box store (which by the way is no slouch, with at rating of 4.6 and over 1,550 reviews). Here are some of the differences and my impressions, and why I decided to return: - Looks: Absolutely gorgeous watch with tremendous build quality. The epitome of "rugged good looks". If you are a fan of this classic G-Shock model then this alone may be reason enough for you to buy. I love the cleaner look on the face; no colors and less busy. The watch itself definitely has a little more weight (74 grams) than the DW-5600-E (52 grams), obviously due to the stainless steel casing. Many reviewers have mentioned the "diamond-like coating" or whatever. I admit it looks beautiful but the fact is that this part is facing your wrist when wearing, so it`s not like you see it. But you do see the front, and the clean, non-colored lines just look awesome. That said, the DW-5600 has a cleaner look than some of the other versions in this series, and so is adequate. - Comfort. Both watches are comfortable, but the GW-5000-1JF does have a more comfortable band. The rubber is just a little softer, more "supple". This said, the DW-5600-E is certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact due to the lighter weight it is arguably more wearable 24/7 (though this is subjective). - Atomic time syncing. The GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 doesn`t. I really had to think a lot about this one, and how important this was to me. On the one hand, it is great to know that you never have to reset your watch, and that it always has the correct time. When I received the GW-5000, multiple times I tried to manually sync but was having difficulty, likely due to clouds in my area at the time. However that same night the time updated automatically at around 2:00 AM, in spite of the clouds. Indeed, about 25%+ of the manual is dedicated to explaining all the conditions where the syncing may not work. But based on my experience, as well as other reviewers, I do not expect there would be many problems with this. As for my DW-5600, two weeks ago to the day I manually set the time to atomic time. Two weeks later it reads 1 second fast. This translates to approximately 2 seconds per month and 24 seconds per year. I decided I can live with that, as it literally takes just seconds to reset the time. - Solar power. Again the GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 does not. Again it seems to be a cool feature. But then I began to consider a few other things. Multiple reviewers on the DW-5600 say they got 5+ years out of the battery, and then went to Wal-Mart or wherever to get another and replaced themselves. On the other hand, the GW-5000 (a) may last 10-15 years but (b) would still eventually need a replacement battery and (c) which would no doubt be more expensive, (d) and would likely need to be ordered, and (e) would then need to be taken to a jeweler to replace, when at the same time (f) in 10-15 years who knows what watches will be available, including the latest version of this G-Shock, in which case I may want to replace the whole watch anyway!. So again I decided that this was a cool feature but overall not an important one. - Alarms. The GW-5000 has 5 alarms including a snooze. Personally I do not have a need for this many alarms, but I can certainly see applications for this. That said, I would love to have the "snooze" feature, which the DW-5600 does not have. The fact is that on both watches the alarm is simply not very loud, nor is there any vibration feature. Because of this I would never trust this watch to wake me up, perhaps not even with a snooze feature. For this reason I decided that the differences in alarm features were not important enough for me to keep the GW-5000. - Countdown timer. This is where things start to get a little interesting, if not outright peculiar: When setting the timer on the GW-5000, the controls allow bi-directional capabilities. In other words, if the timer is currently set to 10 minutes and you want to reset it for 5 minutes, you can go directly to "5" (and if you accidentally pass it can use another button to go back up). In this same scenario on the DW-5600 however, to change the timer from 10 minutes to 5 minutes you can only go one direction (up), which means you have to pass through 11 up to 59, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and finally back to 5 (and if you accidentally pass 5 you have to do this again). For this reason alone I almost kept the GW-5000, because the implementation of setting the timer is just so much better. And I use the timer all the time, such as when I`m on the grill, when I`m allocating play time remaining for my 4 year old, to when I need to put my ear plugs in before descending on a plane. HOWEVER... there are two areas where the DW-5600 timer features actually exceeds the GW-5000: (a) The DW-5600 allows you to set seconds (for example, set to 10 minutes and 45 seconds). Curiously the GW-5000 only allows minutes; (b) As with other G-Shock models, when changing modes in the DW-5600 the time is still visible in all modes. It is absolutely baffling that in this high end, expensive GW-5000 model that it is not! This to me is a tremendous flaw as there is no reference to the time when in timer moode. And I do not want to hear that Casio is just "being faithful to the original design from decades ago" or whatever, because atomic time and solar power were also not in the original design, yet Casio saw fit to update this glorious model with the latest technology. But for some reason on these features they did not. Shrug. - Light. The GW-5000 has a nice feature where if you tilt the wrist, the light will come on (and they`ve even made it where this only happens in low-light conditions, which saves battery power; a very nice feature/design). The DW-5600 does not have this featue. However, again there is a deficiency here when compared with the DW-5600: Where the light on the DW-5600 will stay on for 3 seconds, the light on the GW-5000 will only stay on for 2 seconds. I suppose that there is a subjective element here and that some may consider the shorter time to be preferable. However, I personally had problems with this. There were several times when the light just wasn`t on long enough for me to see the time. I`ve never had this problem with the DW-5600. Also there is no way (on either watch) to change this setting to a longer or shorter time, which is a shame. Again, your mileage may very on this, but it was at times a struggle for me. Also, know that on virtually all Casio G-Shock models there is no way to keep the light on in any mode when making changes, nor to keep the light on. So for example, if you`re all tucked into bed and remember that you need to set the alarm, be prepared to get up and turn the light on so you can see to set the alarm. Which to me is quite peculiar and dysfunctional. So, the bottom-line is this: The GW-5000-1JF is an absolutely beautiful watch. If this watch for you represents some sort of nostalgic trip to the past, or if you just want the best looking watch in this model, then this is your watch. It is a combination of beautiful and rugged. But the fact is this: For $150-180 you can buy a similar model with exactly the same features, and also made in Japan (see GW-M5610-1BJF or GW-M5610BC-1JF). These do not include a steel case however (though they are lighter). So basically, you are paying an extra $150 for the steel case, and the cleaner look. As much as I loved the watch, I just couldn`t justify the steeper price, especially when there were a couple of significant areas where I considered it deficient to my DW-5600. Barring these deficiencies, I would have kept the watch. I just like the look and feel of it so much. For the future, I hope Casio will consider correcting these differences, and also perhaps adding in a vibration feature (but one that is more powerful than the GD-350, which was too weak). One last note to an already too long review: My wrists are approximately 7.25". When I first put this watch on it looked small. I had been wearing something with a slightly bigger face. However, after wearing a couple of days the look really grew on me, and it no longer seemed too small. I do wish the face was about 20% larger, but unless you just have huge wrists I wouldn`t be concerned about the size. It`s a great looking watch, tough and rugged looked but more subdued than some of the other G-Shock models. Good luck and peace be with you.