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G shock gw 5000

G shock gw 5000

G shock gw 5000

In 1983, Casio engineer Kikuo Ibe designed the first G-Shock: the DW-5000C. [1] It had a 10-year battery life, water resistance to 10 bar and was able to survive a 10 meter fall onto a hard surface (he tested 200 prototypes by dropping them from rooftops or third story windows). [2] [3] [4] . [5] The shock resistant design has 10 layers protecting the quartz timekeeping module [2] , including a urethane rubber bumper, the stainless steel case, the hardened mineral glass watch crystal, the stainless steel screwed down caseback, and the "floating module" where the quartz mechanism floats free in a urethane foam cradle, with the outer buttons and LCD module attached with flexible cables. Casio released the G-Shock in April 1983, to fill the demand for durable watches. The popularity of G-Shocks increased throughout the 1990s. By 1998 Casio released over 200 G-Shock models. By then Casio had sold 19 million G-Shocks worldwide. [6] In 1991, Casio released the Baby-G series for women. G-Shock Mini are 70% the size of a G-Shock, for people who have smaller wrists. They are available in Japan and can be shipped worldwide. On September 1 2017, Casio celebrated its 100 millionth shipment of G-Shocks worldwide. [6] The line of watches now includes atomic clock synchronization and solar battery . The Cockpit Series G-Shock is the official timekeeper of Nismo Racing. Many newer G-Shocks feature metal (steel or titanium) banding and analog timekeeping. DW are standard G-Shocks while GW G-Shocks comes in either Tough Solar or Atomic or both. Twice a year the basic models are updated. New limited models are introduced more frequently through the year. As with Swatch watches, G-Shocks have become collectors items. Casio also produces collaboration models, often with popular fashion brands, like A Bathing Ape (Bape), Stussy , [7] Xlarge, KIKS TYO , Nano Universe, Levi`s , Lifted Research Group, as well as Coca Cola , Pulp68 Skateshop, Lucky Strike and Marlboro . G-Shock watches are popular with mountaineers , firefighters , paramedics , people working in the offshore, police officers , astronauts , film directors ( Tony Scott was often pictured wearing a GW-3000B, as is Ron Howard and Francis Ford Coppola ) and soldiers . Ex- Special Forces-British SAS soldier Andy McNab mentions in several of his novels how his character Nick Stone relies on a G-Shock watch. According to Mark Bowden `s book Blackhawk Down , the DELTA Operators wore G-Shock watches during the combat events of 3 & 4 October 1993. Since then, G-Shock watches have become very popular with Special Forces groups in both American and other NATO nation units, due to their being "battle tested".[ citation needed ] Models DW-5600C, DW-5600E, DW-5900, DW-6600, DW-6900 are flight-qualified for NASA space travel. [8] Casio has updated the DW-5600E module, replacing the usual 1545 module with module number 3229 (in 2010). [9] In 2012, Casio released GB-6900, a Bluetooth -capable model of G-Shock. Casio claimed the battery life of 2 years on a single CR2032 battery. [10] Casio continues to add new features to G-Shock watches. Some include Tough Solar battery charging and Multiband 6 time synchronization through radio signals from six transmission stations worldwide. The GW-9400 Rangeman and GWN-1000 Gulfmaster models have a Triple Sensor with a digital compass, thermometer, and barometer/altimeter. The MTG-S1000, GW-A1000, and GPW-1000 feature Triple G Resist which includes resistance to shock, centrifugal gravity , and vibration. In 2014 Casio introduced the GPS Hybrid Wave Ceptor feature in the GPW-1000 Gravitymaster that allows the watch to synchronize the time through GPS signals and also adjusts the time zone automatically. The MRG-G1000 is also equipped with this feature.[ citation needed ] For square G-Shock watches this is highest end premium watch. This model is only available for the Japan domestic Market. The features for this watch include a screw down watch back, DLC (diamond-like carbon) coating, softer and higher quality urethane strap, steel module case, slightly heavier build quality, slightly thicker watch case, solar charging, multi-band 6 and back-light. [11] This model is similar to the GW-5000 but at a fraction of the price. [12] It represents excellent value for the money when compared to the 5000, however the 5610 is still an excellent watch even by itself and many users will definitely be more than happy with this G-Shock without paying more than twice the price for the 5000. To clear up any confusion, even though this watch has a higher model number (5610), the 5000 is considered a superior watch in many ways. Visually there is a red outline on the 5610 watch face compared to the more low-key 5000. G-Shock watches with Multi-Band 6 can tune into an atomic clock for automatic time keeping. There are currently six radio towers around the world: Watches can tune in to two locations: The 40kHz signal from JJY at Mount Otakadoya, near Fukushima (Ohtakadoyayama). Watches tune to the 68kHz signal from BPC at Shangqiu . This is the newest additional signal; older multi-band 5 watches will not be able to connect to this signal. You will need to upgrade to a newer multi-band 6 watch for it to work. On December 12 2017, G-Shock has earned the Guinness World Record for the heaviest vehicle to drive over a watch. Guinness World Record drove a 24.97 ton truck over the Casio G-Shock DW5600E-1. The G-Shock is the first watch by any company being able to withstand the challenge. [13]

There are a number of G-shock watches that Casio produces only for sale to the Japanese domestic market (JDM). Some of these are upgraded or specialized versions of common G-Shock models. This list of Japan-only G-Shocks focuses on the 5000-series models. Current models that are part of the 5000-series include the common DW-5600 and the GW-M5610 models. Other 5000-series models that are less well-known but recognizable to G-Shock enthusiasts include the DW-D5500, GW-5500, and the widely exalted origin model GW-5000 . The 5000-series is the most historically significant G-Shock line as it descends directly from the original G-Shock from 1983, the DW-5000C-1A. In the past the only way to get the JDM G-Shock models was through personal contacts in Japan, but now thanks to the efficiency of e-commerce they are easily obtainable. You will have to pay a premium for these imports but their uniqueness makes up for it. They are also excellent selections for those who want to go shopping for G-shock watches in Japan to take home a special memento. Here are the Japanese import G-shock 5000-series watches that are worth looking into. Many people who fall in love with G-Shock and start building a collection will eventually start thinking about getting the GW-5000, sometimes to the point of obsession. Others who are new to G-Shock may want a premium watch with a classic design that is a step above the typical model. The GW-5000 is a simple watch with a body that is based on the first G-Shock ever, the DW-5000C. Like the first G-Shock it has a screw-lock case back and is the only current G-Shock along with the Frogman that has this feature. It adds modern features like Tough Solar power and Multi-Band 6 atomic time-syncing. While its look is intentionally basic and its features are not the most advanced available, it is considered a “prestige” G-Shock because of its high price and because in addition to its screw-back with diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, it has a full stainless steel case under the bezel while standard 5600 models have a plastic case. It also has a nicer overall finish than a 5600 model and uses a softer and more comfortable urethane band. The GW-5000 is exclusively made in Japan which accounts for its higher price. Only the most observant and knowledgeable G-Shock enthusiasts will recognize this watch on the street. While it won’t buy you instant status with the general public, owning the GW-5000 is one of the best ways to express your appreciation of G-Shock and its history. Technically it’s not a 5000 series G-Shock but the GXW-56 series is considered to be part of the “square” family and is clearly based on the 5600 body. It can be described simply as an over-sized and extreme version of the 5600. Previously available internationally as the GX-56, that model was discontinued and it is now only available as the GXW-56 from Japan with Tough Solar/Multi-Band 6. This extra large watch measures 55.5 x 53.6 x 17.5mm and is nicknamed “The King” by the hardcore G-Shock fans. It’s extra large size gives it even more protection than a typical G-Shock and it is very likely one of the toughest G-Shock models ever made. Its protected button design also offers mud and dust resistance. Those who are hesitant to wear a large watch should stay far away. For those who want one of the largest all-digital G-Shock watches the GXW-56 is a dream come true. The GXW-56-1BJF pictured here has light yellow lettering and a standard LCD display. It is also available as the GXW-56-1AJF with a red-accented face, red buttons, and reverse display. For the man in uniform: GW-M5610BC-1JF Composite Band G-Shock The GW-M5610BC-1JF is a solar and atomic powered GW-M5610 with a composite metal/resin band with a traditional folding clasp. Its low profile would go well with uniforms while its composite band and reverse display gives it a tough, no-nonsense look. The metal part of the band is treated with a black ion plating. This Japanese model is suggested for those who are concerned that a traditional resin band may not be durable enough over the long haul, or for those who want to be able to put on and remove the watch very quickly and easily. Another good use for this watch is to swap out the composite band with the GW-5000. If you like the reverse display but would rather have a traditional resin band, there is also the GW-M5610-1BJF . The reason to buy the GW-S5600-1JF is for its distinctive carbon fiber insert band but it comes at a premium price. Unlike some of the aviation models and Japanese market Master of G watches featuring bands with carbon fiber inserts that can only be seen on the inner side of the band, the carbon fiber pattern can be distinctly seen from the outer side of the band on this model. In addition to this unique design the dark bezel is glossy and translucent, making this Japanese import a good choice if you want your G-Shock to stand out from the crowd. The GW-5510-1BJF is basically a DW-D5500 (amazon) with Tough Solar, Multi-Band 6, stealth lettering, and a reverse display. It is also available in black with a standard display (GW-5510-1JF) and a white version (see Amazon link). The 5510 case with its covered buttons is a direct descendant of the 1985 DW-5500C which was also known as “G-Shock II” and was the first model to be nicknamed the Mudman for its mud and dust resistance. The 5500 is not a commonly seen G-Shock on the street and those who like its retro look would be wise to upgrade to this maintenance-free Japanese version. For the surfer or fisherman: GWX-5600C-7JF Solar Tide G-Shock The GWX-5600 G-Lide is like the GLX-5600 with its tide and moon graph and adds Tough Solar and Multi-Band 6. This makes it a top choice for surfers who want an unobtrusive, low profile tide watch that is solar powered and has atomic timekeeping. The watch comes in white (GWX-5600C-7JF), red (GWX-5600C-4JF) and black (GWX-5600-1JF). This model was previously available internationally but was discontinued and some of that stock can still be found at a reasonable price. The black version features an unusual color scheme with orange, yellow, and blue lettering. Bull bar face protectors were a common site on G-Shock 5600 models in the 90s and were particularly popular with skateboarders. They aren’t as widespread now but there is still some demand for them both as a retro fashion accessory and a protective add-on. The DW-5600P-1JF (black), DW-5600P-4JF (red), and DW-5600P-9JF (yellow) are some of the only current G-Shock models that include a bull bar. These Japanese models are based on the basic battery-powered DW-5600, so they are the most affordable watches on this list. The fact that the orange-accented GW-M5610R-1JF exists makes us wonder why there aren’t a lot of other similarly accented 5600 models for sale in Japan. It’s a great looking watch with its orange lettering, ring-dial, and orange-tinted standard LCD display. Perhaps it would be best suited for rescue workers or someone with an orange team jersey or shirt like a die-hard fan of the Broncos, Browns, Bengals, or Orioles. There is also a light-blue accented GW-M5610BA-1JF and a lime green-accented GW-M5610B-1J that are still available but no longer part of the current lineup.

I really loved this watch, but ultimately decided to return and just continue using my basic $50 DW-5600-E that I picked up at a big box store (which by the way is no slouch, with at rating of 4.6 and over 1,550 reviews). Here are some of the differences and my impressions, and why I decided to return: - Looks: Absolutely gorgeous watch with tremendous build quality. The epitome of "rugged good looks". If you are a fan of this classic G-Shock model then this alone may be reason enough for you to buy. I love the cleaner look on the face; no colors and less busy. The watch itself definitely has a little more weight (74 grams) than the DW-5600-E (52 grams), obviously due to the stainless steel casing. Many reviewers have mentioned the "diamond-like coating" or whatever. I admit it looks beautiful but the fact is that this part is facing your wrist when wearing, so it`s not like you see it. But you do see the front, and the clean, non-colored lines just look awesome. That said, the DW-5600 has a cleaner look than some of the other versions in this series, and so is adequate. - Comfort. Both watches are comfortable, but the GW-5000-1JF does have a more comfortable band. The rubber is just a little softer, more "supple". This said, the DW-5600-E is certainly not uncomfortable, and in fact due to the lighter weight it is arguably more wearable 24/7 (though this is subjective). - Atomic time syncing. The GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 doesn`t. I really had to think a lot about this one, and how important this was to me. On the one hand, it is great to know that you never have to reset your watch, and that it always has the correct time. When I received the GW-5000, multiple times I tried to manually sync but was having difficulty, likely due to clouds in my area at the time. However that same night the time updated automatically at around 2:00 AM, in spite of the clouds. Indeed, about 25%+ of the manual is dedicated to explaining all the conditions where the syncing may not work. But based on my experience, as well as other reviewers, I do not expect there would be many problems with this. As for my DW-5600, two weeks ago to the day I manually set the time to atomic time. Two weeks later it reads 1 second fast. This translates to approximately 2 seconds per month and 24 seconds per year. I decided I can live with that, as it literally takes just seconds to reset the time. - Solar power. Again the GW-5000 has it, the DW-5600 does not. Again it seems to be a cool feature. But then I began to consider a few other things. Multiple reviewers on the DW-5600 say they got 5+ years out of the battery, and then went to Wal-Mart or wherever to get another and replaced themselves. On the other hand, the GW-5000 (a) may last 10-15 years but (b) would still eventually need a replacement battery and (c) which would no doubt be more expensive, (d) and would likely need to be ordered, and (e) would then need to be taken to a jeweler to replace, when at the same time (f) in 10-15 years who knows what watches will be available, including the latest version of this G-Shock, in which case I may want to replace the whole watch anyway!. So again I decided that this was a cool feature but overall not an important one. - Alarms. The GW-5000 has 5 alarms including a snooze. Personally I do not have a need for this many alarms, but I can certainly see applications for this. That said, I would love to have the "snooze" feature, which the DW-5600 does not have. The fact is that on both watches the alarm is simply not very loud, nor is there any vibration feature. Because of this I would never trust this watch to wake me up, perhaps not even with a snooze feature. For this reason I decided that the differences in alarm features were not important enough for me to keep the GW-5000. - Countdown timer. This is where things start to get a little interesting, if not outright peculiar: When setting the timer on the GW-5000, the controls allow bi-directional capabilities. In other words, if the timer is currently set to 10 minutes and you want to reset it for 5 minutes, you can go directly to "5" (and if you accidentally pass it can use another button to go back up). In this same scenario on the DW-5600 however, to change the timer from 10 minutes to 5 minutes you can only go one direction (up), which means you have to pass through 11 up to 59, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 and finally back to 5 (and if you accidentally pass 5 you have to do this again). For this reason alone I almost kept the GW-5000, because the implementation of setting the timer is just so much better. And I use the timer all the time, such as when I`m on the grill, when I`m allocating play time remaining for my 4 year old, to when I need to put my ear plugs in before descending on a plane. HOWEVER... there are two areas where the DW-5600 timer features actually exceeds the GW-5000: (a) The DW-5600 allows you to set seconds (for example, set to 10 minutes and 45 seconds). Curiously the GW-5000 only allows minutes; (b) As with other G-Shock models, when changing modes in the DW-5600 the time is still visible in all modes. It is absolutely baffling that in this high end, expensive GW-5000 model that it is not! This to me is a tremendous flaw as there is no reference to the time when in timer moode. And I do not want to hear that Casio is just "being faithful to the original design from decades ago" or whatever, because atomic time and solar power were also not in the original design, yet Casio saw fit to update this glorious model with the latest technology. But for some reason on these features they did not. Shrug. - Light. The GW-5000 has a nice feature where if you tilt the wrist, the light will come on (and they`ve even made it where this only happens in low-light conditions, which saves battery power; a very nice feature/design). The DW-5600 does not have this featue. However, again there is a deficiency here when compared with the DW-5600: Where the light on the DW-5600 will stay on for 3 seconds, the light on the GW-5000 will only stay on for 2 seconds. I suppose that there is a subjective element here and that some may consider the shorter time to be preferable. However, I personally had problems with this. There were several times when the light just wasn`t on long enough for me to see the time. I`ve never had this problem with the DW-5600. Also there is no way (on either watch) to change this setting to a longer or shorter time, which is a shame. Again, your mileage may very on this, but it was at times a struggle for me. Also, know that on virtually all Casio G-Shock models there is no way to keep the light on in any mode when making changes, nor to keep the light on. So for example, if you`re all tucked into bed and remember that you need to set the alarm, be prepared to get up and turn the light on so you can see to set the alarm. Which to me is quite peculiar and dysfunctional. So, the bottom-line is this: The GW-5000-1JF is an absolutely beautiful watch. If this watch for you represents some sort of nostalgic trip to the past, or if you just want the best looking watch in this model, then this is your watch. It is a combination of beautiful and rugged. But the fact is this: For $150-180 you can buy a similar model with exactly the same features, and also made in Japan (see GW-M5610-1BJF or GW-M5610BC-1JF). These do not include a steel case however (though they are lighter). So basically, you are paying an extra $150 for the steel case, and the cleaner look. As much as I loved the watch, I just couldn`t justify the steeper price, especially when there were a couple of significant areas where I considered it deficient to my DW-5600. Barring these deficiencies, I would have kept the watch. I just like the look and feel of it so much. For the future, I hope Casio will consider correcting these differences, and also perhaps adding in a vibration feature (but one that is more powerful than the GD-350, which was too weak). One last note to an already too long review: My wrists are approximately 7.25". When I first put this watch on it looked small. I had been wearing something with a slightly bigger face. However, after wearing a couple of days the look really grew on me, and it no longer seemed too small. I do wish the face was about 20% larger, but unless you just have huge wrists I wouldn`t be concerned about the size. It`s a great looking watch, tough and rugged looked but more subdued than some of the other G-Shock models. Good luck and peace be with you.